Labnotes

Weekend Reading — git commit upworthy

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Our CTO has discovered an incredible way of making developers read his commit messages. You won’t even believe how he did it!

Tools of the Trade

How we make RWD sites load fast as heck Async and inline all the things (in the critical path). Related, Above-the-fold CSS Tools.

Semver has failed us Version numbers are for people to read, and incidentally for machines to interpret. That's why I don't think ferver is useful either. I much prefer "major change"."minor change"."fixed something" and a proper changelog.

ghwd Open the github URL that matches your shell's current branch and working directory.

Gmelius Browser extension that makes Gmail UI simpler and more useful.

redirect_blame "Zero-downtime deploys are hard. Why bother when you can trick your users into thinking their internet is a little flaky? They'll keep refreshing until your deploy is over."

@dshack:

If I was malicious, I’d build a JSON pretty-printer and scrape it for API keys.

NotepadConf "The premier technology conference for Notepad.exe users and text enthusiasts."


Lines of Code

@drawohara:

the best indicator of code quality is the speed at which it can be re-factored or augmented.

@kellabyte:

Always tempting to just write it yourself instead of using already existing code. Then 6 weeks later it sucks and you need 3 weeks to fix it

@sstephenson:

By far my favorite open-source phenomenon is the person who threatens to switch to another project in the issue tracker comments


None of the Above

Nnavdy HUD for your car.

Women Won't Name Harassing Venture Capitalists, Even Anonymously Shame on us.

Bio-high-tech treatment for Ebola may have saved two US citizens Antibodies made inside a mice, then engineered to look human, and replicated in tobacco. And they say hardest problem in CS is naming things …

donotlink Responsive linking: link without improving "their" search engine position.

@dbtindall:

My son pointed out to me today that Mars is the only planet in the solar system solely inhabited by functioning robots.

Mobile phones slightly bigger in 1960